Knee Therapy for Osteoarthritis

Knee Replacement and Arthritis: Some people suffer from knee pain and swelling, but don’t want to get surgery. Others have an arthritic knee already and are in search of a natural remedy for their pain. Still others have no idea what to do. Knee Replacement and Arthritis: Some people may not want to get surgery. Others may have an arthritic knee already and do not want to undergo another treatment that involves injections. Still others simply have no idea what to do.

All of these situations can leave a person in a frustrating state. They need Knee Therapy to manage their pain and treat their symptoms. Knee Replacement and Arthritis: Some people may not want to get surgery. Others may have an arthritic knee already and do not want to undergo another treatment that involves injections. Still others simply have no idea what to do.

Knee Therapy treats the vastus medialis oblique muscle, the vastus lateralis, the medial collateral ligament, the patellar tendon, and the anterior cruciate ligament. The goal of this therapy is to strengthen the muscles surrounding the knee so that knee pain and swelling do not interfere with daily life. It is used to reduce pain, limit or eliminate knee swelling, and improve function. This type of therapy focuses on strengthening the muscles of the buttock, hip adductor, groin, and quadriceps. It also works on strengthening the muscles of the thighs and lower legs to relieve pressure on these areas.

During Knee Therapy, your physical therapist will design a program of stretches, exercises, and relaxation routines specifically for you. Your therapist may use heat and ice therapy to relieve inflammation, and he or she may recommend using a brace or traction device. Physical therapists and osteoarthritis experts believe that there are certain foods and beverages that can be beneficial in helping to relieve knee pain. Eating foods that are rich in Vitamin A, B, and E can help keep knee joints lubricated. Staying away from alcohol, tobacco, caffeine, and food that contain too much estrogen can also ease knee pain. Adding foods that are rich in antioxidants can also be helpful.

Knee Therapy is effective for both menisci (the front part of the knee) and women (the back portion of the knee). There are two types of physical therapy treatment for meniscus tears; total knee replacement surgery, and meniscectomy. Meniscectomy is used for complete tears; it is a surgical procedure that removes the damaged portion of the meniscus. Knee replacement surgery is only recommended for meniscus tears that are extreme. Knee replacement surgery requires general anesthesia, which can be hazardous for long periods of time. Physical therapy can be very effective for treating mild to moderate meniscus tears.

The most common type of physical therapy treatment for osteoarthritis involves weight-bearing exercise. Weight bearing exercises can improve strength, range of motion, and balance; however, it may not help relieve pain. In some cases, a total knee replacement physical therapy program may be required; this will involve the use of a hip/upper-body device (i.e., gym chair), and/or physical therapy to strengthen muscles in the affected area.

Knee arthritis can cause inflammation and irritation to the knee joint. Physical therapists can help alleviate knee pain by using a variety of techniques, including: gentle stretching, ice, heat, and/or massage. Some medical doctors do not recommend exercise when osteoarthritis is present because it may actually make the condition worse. It is important to remember that meniscus tears and meniscal impingement are common in people who have osteoarthritis. In addition, if the tear or impingement is severe medical intervention may be required.

Physical therapy can also help reduce pain from osteoarthritis through the development of a program of rehabilitation. Rehabilitation involves training the affected muscles and/or tissues to function properly again. Exercises targeted at strengthening the muscles surrounding the knee pain can also help reduce inflammation and increase flexibility. Knee bracing and stabilization exercises can also be used in rehabilitation programs to help restore normal range of motion and function. If your doctor determines that osteoarthritis is causing the symptoms you are experiencing, you may need to undergo an evaluation and treatment procedure to address the condition.